Concrete building – Fonti Di Pace http://fontidipace.com/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 04:10:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://fontidipace.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/icon-54.png Concrete building – Fonti Di Pace http://fontidipace.com/ 32 32 Jun ong’s starburst lights up concrete building in Malaysia https://fontidipace.com/jun-ongs-starburst-lights-up-concrete-building-in-malaysia/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 10:30:46 +0000 https://fontidipace.com/jun-ongs-starburst-lights-up-concrete-building-in-malaysia/

jun ong builds star / KL with 111 illuminated fragments

seven years after the artist jun ong integrated a shining star in an unfinished building in Malaysia, now, at the end of a pandemic, it shapes a Shard of Light, made up of 111 illuminated fragments. this phenomenon takes place in the heart of kuala lumpur, enlighten its new host (called the aerial building), a composite of raw concrete and shards of metal located on the border between nature and the city. the lighting installation is integrated into the core of the four-storey building, with some of its rays piercing its envelope.

glimpse of the star / KL through the openings of the host building

all images from david yeow photography

a star with a lifespan of 122 days

star / KL is a temporary, site-specific installation designed by jun ong (see more here) in collaboration with the cultural economy development agency (CENDANE) as part of their Art in the city 2021 program. the new “star” takes the form of a star assembled by a fusion of linear light elements. as a result, intense light paths form, penetrating the building and extending towards the bustling city.

as the artist mentioned, throughout his stay here the “star” will learn, adapt and provide us with new facets of thinking as terrestrial, cosmic and human beings. over time, its illumination will gradually decrease, and after 122 days the star will dissipate and live in hyperspace until it finds a new host.

Faded star made up of 111 illuminated fragments lights up concrete building in Malaysia
facade interaction and core overview

Identified as siblings, the two installations were designed to invite passers-by to perceive light and space, imbuing cosmic magic into daily city life. in its iteration kuala lumpur, the pulsating illumination of ‘star’ is accompanied by an otherworldly soundscape designed by reza othman of the malaysian experimental electronics and jazz project RAO.

Faded star made up of 111 illuminated fragments lights up concrete building in Malaysia
relationship with the urban fabric of kuala lumpur

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World’s Largest 3D Printed Concrete Building Made by GUtech University in Muscat https://fontidipace.com/worlds-largest-3d-printed-concrete-building-made-by-gutech-university-in-muscat/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 10:27:00 +0000 https://fontidipace.com/worlds-largest-3d-printed-concrete-building-made-by-gutech-university-in-muscat/

For many years, Dubai, which has implemented a 3D printing policy of 25% of all new buildings by 2030, has held the
pole position for construction 3D printing, but this position is now contested by Oman – the largest 3D printing in the world
real printed concrete building in Oman with very low cost of printed materials.

The German University of Technology in Oman, GUtech, on Tuesday December 14, 2021 celebrated the end of 3D
printing the walls of the largest 3D printed building in the world to date made with real concrete. The importance of
The event was marked by the presence of His Excellency Sultan Al-Habsi, Minister of Finance of Oman as well as more than
200 guests including several ministers and personalities from Oman, who attended the event in Muscat, the capital of Oman.

The house consists of 190 m2 (2100 SF) and is typical of social housing in Oman. It has 3 bedrooms, three bathrooms,
a living room, a kitchen and a reception area for guests. The house was printed in two stages. While the recipe for materials was
adjusted and the training of the Omani crew took place during the printing of the first part of the house, the second part of the
The house was made by the Omani crew on their own and it only took five days. A sign of quick learning and
productivity improvements occurring in 3D printed projects.

Dr Hussain, Acting Rector of GUtech, said: “Today’s presentation of the first 3D printed building is perhaps the first step in the
trip of a thousand. A step that will not be a success without the support of all parties concerned. In this regard, I sincerely thank all
local and international actors who contribute to the support of the center and the University. We hope that this center will play its
participate in supporting Oman’s efforts to achieve Oman’s Vision 2040. “

While the Middle East has seen many 3D printed buildings, the 190 m2 (2,100 SF) building in Oman is the first to be
printed with real concrete instead of the traditional dry mix mortars used in most other 3D printed buildings. To do the
concrete 3D printable, GUtech applied the D.fab solution developed by COBOD and CEMEX in cooperation where the
concrete can have particles up to 10mm (1/3 inch) and is made from locally available cement, sand and gravel. CEMEX
and COBOD announced last week the news of the D.fab solution in connection with the first 3D printed building in Angola.
The D.fab solution was also used in Angola with the result that the cost of concrete materials was less than 1000 USD for
the 52 m2 (575 ft2) house.

On this occasion Juan Romero, Executive Vice-President Sustainable, Commercial and Operational Development of CEMEX
said, “The introduction of this revolutionary 3D printing system is a testament to our customer-centric and relentless mindset.
focus on continuous innovation and improvement. In collaboration with COBOD, we have developed an experience for
customers which is superior to anything that has been supplied in the past ”.

In the case of Oman, more than 99.5% of the materials used were local, of which less than 0.5% came from Europe as
D.fab additives. In Oman, the cost of materials for 3D printing the walls of the 190 m2 house (2,100 SF) was less than
1,600 euros. According to COBOD, if a printable dry mortar had been used, the cost of materials would be more than
20,000 euros, and these are such significant cost reductions that COBOD and CEMEX were aiming for with their cooperation.

Commenting on this milestone for the widespread adoption of the 3D construction printing method, Henrik Lund-Nielsen,
The Founder and Managing Director of COBOD International said, “Although we have been happy to help various cement and concrete
manufacturers are developing 3D printable dry mortars, we also insisted that a solution to make real concrete
from locally available materials would be required for massive application of our technology. We are more than delighted that
CEMEX took up the challenge and proud that we were able to co-develop the new solution, which GUtech now has
applied to the first building in Oman. With the low cost of printed documents, in addition to the savings of not needing
the formwork and minimal team needed to run our printers, our disruptive technology is now more competitive than ever
previously in Oman and around the world ”.

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The real AM concrete building produced by GUtech University »3dpbm https://fontidipace.com/the-real-am-concrete-building-produced-by-gutech-university-3dpbm/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 12:26:55 +0000 https://fontidipace.com/the-real-am-concrete-building-produced-by-gutech-university-3dpbm/
Stay up to date on all that is happening in the wonderful world of AM through our LinkedIn community.

On Tuesday, December 14, 2021, the German University of Technology Oman, GUtech, completed 3D printing of the walls of what is the largest 3D printed building made of real concrete to date. The importance of the event was marked by the presence of His Excellency Sultan Al-Habsi, Minister of Finance of Oman, as well as more than 200 guests, including several ministers and personalities of Oman, who attended the event in Muscat, the capital of Oman.

The house consists of 190 m2 (2,100 square feet) and is typical of social housing in Oman. It has 3 bedrooms, three bathrooms, a living room, a kitchen and a reception area for guests. The house was printed in two stages. While the recipe of the materials was adjusted and the training of the Omani team took place during the printing of the first part of the house, the second part of the house was made by the Omani team itself. same and it only took five days. A sign of rapid improvement in learning and productivity in 3D printed projects.

GUtech Acting Rector Dr Hussain said: “Today’s presentation of the first 3D printed building is perhaps the first stop on a 1,000 mile journey. A step that will not be crowned with success without the support of all parties concerned. In this regard, I sincerely thank all local and international parties who contribute to the support of the center and the University. We hope that this center will play its role in supporting Oman’s efforts to achieve Oman’s Vision 2040. “

While the Middle East has seen many buildings 3D printed, the 190 m2 (2,100 square feet) building in Oman is the first to be printed with real concrete instead of the traditional dry mortars used in most other buildings printed in 3D. To make the concrete 3D printable, GUtech applied the D.fab solution developed by COBOD and CEMEX in cooperation where the concrete can have particles up to 10mm (1/3 inch) and is made from cement, sand and gravel available locally. . CEMEX and COBOD announced last week the news of the D.fab solution in connection with the first 3D printed building in Angola. The D.fab solution was also used in Angola with the result that the cost of concrete materials was less than 1000 USD for the 52 m2 house (575 SF).

In Oman, GUtech celebrated the finishing of the 3D printing of the walls of the AM building with real concrete
On this occasion, Juan Romero, Executive Vice President of Sustainability, Business and Operations of CEMEX, said: “The introduction of this revolutionary 3D printing system is a testament to our customer-centric mindset and to our relentless focus on continuous innovation and improvement. By working with COBOD, we have developed a customer experience that is superior to anything that has been provided in the past ”.

In the case of Oman, more than 99.5% of the materials used were local, of which less than 0.5% came from Europe in the form of D.fab additives. In Oman, the cost of materials for 3D printing the walls of the 190 m2 house (2,100 SF) was less than 1,600 euros. According to COBOD, if a printable dry mortar had been used, the cost of the materials would be over 20,000 euros, and these are cost reductions so significant that COBOD and CEMEX were aiming with their cooperation.

In Oman, GUtech celebrated the finishing of the 3D printing of the walls of the AM building with real concrete

Commenting on this milestone for the widespread adoption of the 3D construction printing method, Henrik Lund-Nielsen, Founder and Managing Director of COBOD International said: also insisted that a solution for making real concrete manufactured from locally available materials would be necessary for the mass application of our technology. We are more than delighted that CEMEX took up the challenge and proud that we were able to co-develop the new solution, which GUtech has now applied to the first building in Oman. With the low cost of printed materials, in addition to the savings from not needing formwork and the minimal team needed to run our printers, our disruptive technology is now more competitive than ever in Oman and everywhere. in the world “.

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Fliegl concrete filling station offers fresh concrete construction https://fontidipace.com/fliegl-concrete-filling-station-offers-fresh-concrete-construction/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://fontidipace.com/fliegl-concrete-filling-station-offers-fresh-concrete-construction/

German company Fliegl Baukom has launched the BTS concrete filling station, which is expected to help construction companies successfully construct with fresh concrete

Fliegl’s BTS at B&O Recycling GbR has been operational for six months. (Image source: Fliegl)

With Fliegl Baukom’s concrete filling station BTS, you can quickly and easily tap fresh concrete yourself.

One of those concrete filling stations is located in Cham. Andreas Bucher, partner at B&O Recycling GbR de Cham, presents the new business sector of his company: The Fliegl BTS 1000 concrete filling and mixing system. The gardening and landscaping company as well as other private and commercial customers benefit from the concrete that is readily available.

A silo holds the cement and there are three extra-large storage bunkers for sand and gravel. The machine automatically starts the mixing process and the conveyor belts deliver fresh sand and gravel before water and cement are added. The mixing process starts and lasts about a minute. The whole process, including loading the concrete onto the customer’s vehicle, takes around three minutes.

Fliegl’s BTS at B&O Recycling GbR has been in operation for six months and more than 1,000 m of concrete have already been delivered. The rapid availability of fresh concrete, as well as the short distances that customers have to travel, are important success factors. In order to relieve the operator of the concrete filling station as much as possible, the BTS is equipped with a self-cleaning system. The cleaning effort is reduced to cleaning once a day.

Due to its connection to the server, FlieglThe concrete filling station can be easily and comprehensively controlled by the customer at any time. The machine is also configured via the computer by setting the mixing ratios using clear user software. The filling amount of the cement silo is also displayed and the moisture content of gravel and sand can be adjusted.

In addition, Fliegl also offers reliable customer service because prompt and quality service is essential if any questions arise. At the request of the customer, Fliegl. Baukom or NSG can access the respective concrete filling station via a network.

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At the forefront of new generation fastening solutions for concrete https://fontidipace.com/at-the-forefront-of-new-generation-fastening-solutions-for-concrete/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://fontidipace.com/at-the-forefront-of-new-generation-fastening-solutions-for-concrete/

New product developments by EJOT UK ensure that the construction industry has access to a wide range of fastening solutions for concrete that offer improved long-term performance and designs that allow for easier use.

The wide range of applications requiring reliable fastening in concrete has led to the development of many innovative fastening solutions. But – as EJOT can demonstrate – there is always room to push the boundaries in terms of technical capabilities, applications and performance expectations.

This underpins EJOT’s commitment to R&D, which benefits from the continued reinvestment of profits to drive new product development, both in the UK and across the EJOT Group.

The latest innovations from EJOT represent a significant development in two of its already popular and widely used ranges.

These are the tangible results of proactive programs led by experienced product designers and engineers from EJOT to empower structural engineers, architects and contractors to think differently about how they attach to concrete.

Upgrades to EJOT UK’s ETA Approved Through Bolt Range

One such development is EJOT’s range of European Technical Assessments (ETAs) – approved through bolts – also known as anchor bolts.

The launch of BA Plus offers a range of Option 1 anchors suitable for cracked and non-cracked concrete applications.

It builds on the strengths of EJOT’s established BA range of torque-controlled expansion anchors, suitable for concrete and other hard base materials, including natural stone.

The benefits are numerous, including:

  • Faster installation – the required installation torque can be achieved with 30-50% less revolutions than before.
  • Secure in thinner concrete – the new M8 and M10 through bolts can now be used for anchoring in concrete up to 20mm thinner.
  • Less risk of installer error – potential for on-site errors is minimized with clearly marked depth of adjustment to the thread and alphabetically coded anchor length marked on each bolt head.

BA Plus provides through bolts for all the most common cracked and uncracked concrete applications ≥ C20 / 25 up to Seismic performance Option 1. Backed by independent assurance of ETA approval, the range offers a reliable solution for many applications including steel structures, column base plates, heavy duty shelving, cable supports, handrails and facades.

But BA Plus is not the only new through-bolt development by EJOT. His UK team has also developed a new range of through bolts for non-cracked concrete applications Option 7, BA-C NC. This provides a premier anchor point for many other applications, including warehouse racks and stadium seating, again backed by third-party assurance of an ETA.

Expanded EJOT Concrete Screw Line Offers New Application Potential

Another major advancement comes from new high performance additions to the EJOT range of carbon steel concrete screws. These provide a considerably extended reach to achieve a secure and reliable fastening for metal fasteners in option 1 cracked, uncracked and hollow concrete, as well as other hard base materials.

These new developments mean that its JC2 self-tapping concrete screws can be used as an alternative to anchors or nylon screw / anchor combinations in a wider range of construction applications. This could include attaching facade scaffolding, shelving and handrails to slats, cable supports and formwork.

Importantly, since these concrete screws do not need expansion, they can be used closer to the edge of the concrete and at smaller spacings than when using anchors. They are also easy to use and install, with no special skills required, which can save you a lot of time on site.

Only a small pilot hole is needed, which generates a relatively small amount of dust. Once this is removed from the hole, the screws are simply driven in – they are completely removable and repositionable, like a standard wood or metal screw, making them a versatile choice.

The JC2 range offers six types of fasteners designed by EJOT’s R&D teams in Germany and the UK, to deliver superior in-situ performance as well as hassle-free installation. All provide independent assurance of ETA approval and are tested to provide fire resistance up to 120 minutes.

A trusted partner for concrete fastening systems in the UK

Five galvanized or zinc alloy coated carbon steel concrete screws form the core product line, but EJOT has also developed a sixth option specifically to meet the needs of the UK market. This ETA approved fastener with improved corrosion resistance is the JC6-KB, a bimetal concrete screw made from A4 316 stainless steel with hardened carbon steel threads.

Accordingly, the JC6-KB is suitable for Option 1 exterior concrete applications approved for environmental classifications from C1 to C4, in accordance with BS EN 12944.

Its development reflects how the UK R&D team, supported by the EJOT Group team in Germany, is uniquely positioned to ensure that local customers have the right products they need to apply them the way they want. The overall EJOT product portfolio can be designed to fit a global market, but that doesn’t mean UK customers have to adapt the way they work when choosing the EJOT brand.

In fact, the team at Sherburn-in-Elmet are proactively developing UK-focused fasteners which are also gaining traction in overseas markets, making a positive contribution to the global construction market. This benefits from the EJOT force which brings together the best of British and German engineering – a combination respected internationally.

Full details of the EJOT range of concrete fastening systems can be found at www.ejot.co.uk, where new brochures for the different ranges can also be requested.

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Calcium carbonate concrete: focus on recycling https://fontidipace.com/calcium-carbonate-concrete-focus-on-recycling/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://fontidipace.com/calcium-carbonate-concrete-focus-on-recycling/

AZoBuild speaks with Professors Noguchi and Maruyama, University of Tokyo, about their research and development of calcium carbonate concrete (CCC), a new material that has the potential to spark a lasting revolution in construction industry.

Takafumi Noguchi

Concrete is the second most-consumed substance on earth after water. As a huge amount of resources (for example cement, which is the main material of concrete, made of limestone) are used in the production of concrete, there is concern about future resource depletion (the meaning of resource depletion includes not only material depletion but also difficulty in collection of resources due to an increase in required energy and cost).

Therefore, we have been developing completely recyclable concrete since the 1990s. In addition, cement production emits 7% of total CO2 worldwide, and we have been working to reduce it through the development of carbon capture technology using concrete waste.

In order to realize a carbon-neutral society by 2050, CCUS technology in which CO2 is used as a resource is required. We thought that if we could produce new concrete from CO2 in the atmosphere and concrete that exists everywhere, we would be able to achieve both carbon neutrality and resource recycling at the same time.

Ippei Maruyama

I have been involved in cement chemistry for 15 years, to understand the functional development mechanisms of cement-based materials. At the same time, I was also doing research in the geological field, especially related to calcium carbonate concretion.

We found that calcium carbonate naturally forms concretion (large agglomeration) in the seabed and binds the sandstone sand in a relatively quick process. I wondered if this process could be applied to make construction materials. Calcium carbonate is made by CO2 and CaO, and these are obtained from the air and demolished concrete. I think that this is a good time in Japan especially to change the construction field to be a more sustainable one.

How significant is the problem of waste and air pollution in the construction industry?

Many resources have been input into the construction of civil structures and buildings since the end of World War II, and if they are demolished after service life a large amount of waste will be generated. Currently, most of them are laid under roads or backfilled in the ground and are not recycled into concrete. Securing the application of recycled concrete waste or constructing the final disposal site then becomes a big problem in the future.

On the other hand, since CO2 emissions related to buildings and civil structures are about half of the world total (including CO2 emissions from energy used for heating and cooling in buildings), ZEB (Zero Energy Building) / ZEH (Zero Energy House) development and dissemination are progressing.

Image Credit: sakoat contributor/Shutterstock.com

If all energy becomes renewable by 2050, only CO2 emissions due to calcination of fossil resources (limestone) will remain, and it is necessary to reduce these. The CO2 emitted by the cement industry is estimated to account for approximately 7% of the world’s total emissions, and has played a role in global warming since the start of the Anthropocene.

Portland cement emits approximately 770 kg-CO2/t of cement during production, of which 480 kg/t is due to the calcination of limestone. The total amount of Portland cement produced globally since the beginning of the 20th century is approximately 110 billion tons, and the total amount produced in Japan is approximately 4 billion tons.

In contrast, the cumulative amount of CO2 produced by the calcination of limestone for cement production is estimated to exceed 2 billion tons (in Japan), and this amount is still increasing.

In general, concrete is made from ordinary cement, where one of the resources is limestone (CaCO3). To obtain the CaO from the limestone, the cement industry must emit CO2 by decomposing limestone.

Therefore, CO2 emission is an inevitable process for the current cement concrete industry. At the same time, the concrete waste can be recognized as an urban mine of CaO. Especially, if we utilize the CaO efficiently from the demolished concrete waste, we will no longer emit CO2 through the production of concrete.

Calcium carbonate concrete is made from waste concrete and CO2 from the air. How are these used to create this new building material?

Concrete waste powder is put into water, and air bubbles are blown into this water to produce a calcium bicarbonate solution.

The solution is flowed between the concrete waste particles in the container. Then, calcium carbonate crystals are precipitated by controlling temperature, pH and evaporation rate.

The calcium carbonate combines the particles to form CCC. In practical applications of CCC, our first approach was to develop bricks made of CCC, and then we will move to building structures such as beams, columns, and walls.

calcium carbonate concrete, CCC, concrete, co2, CO2, cement, waste, sustainability

Image Credit: VanderWolf Images/Shutterstock.com

What are some of the properties of this new concrete? How does it compare to regular concrete?

The most essential property of concrete is compressive strength, and the higher the compressive strength, the higher the tendency for many other good performances (e.g., modulus of elasticity and durability).

The compressive strength of CCC is less than 10MPa at present, which is only 1/4 to 1/3 of the compressive strength of current conventional concrete, but we can utilize it as a construction material for small housing by considering such characteristics.

We are investigating in order for CCC to obtain a compressive strength of 15 to 20 MPa after one year.

Is the carbon used to power the production process more or less than that recycled?

According to the measurement results of a small-scale research facility, a larger amount of energy is currently required to produce CCC.

We believe that the required energy can be reduced by increasing the scale of the equipment and optimizing it. In other words, the current situation where more CO2 is emitted than used (recycled) will be improved in the future.

In recent experiments, some specimens of CCC could be made successfully with less CO2. Even now, total energy and emitted CO2 are already less than those of ordinary concrete.

Are there any further challenges yet to be overcome?

First, we have to increase the strength as well as the size of the material.

Further, as conventional cement concrete is alkaline, the internal reinforcing steel bars are kept free of corrosion; however, because CCC is neutral, the reinforcing steel bars require protection from corrosion, or other materials apart from steel must be used as reinforcement.

Testing the strength of concrete. Image Credit: Zubair Rashid/Shutterstock.com

In addition, a lot of concrete structures are currently constructed on-site using cast-in-place ready-mixed concrete, but CCC structures are expected to be built in the form of assembling precast concrete members on-site. It must be shown that CCC structures constructed in a non-traditional way, using non-traditional concrete, have the same structural safety and functions as before.

It is necessary to develop new structural forms, to establish new design methods for structural safety and durability, and to revise various codes and standards.

How significant do you think the adoption of calcium carbonate concrete in the future would be for the environment?

As CCC is permanently carbon-neutral like wood, and can be recycled as many times as you like for local production and local utilization, it greatly contributes to solving the problems of global warming and resource depletion.

Also, as CCC can be made from resources (concrete waste) already collected from nature, it will not cause the destruction of nature. Therefore, we believe that CCC is a sustainable construction material that can be produced forever.

What do you personally think is the most exciting aspect or potential use of this new material?

Takafumi Noguchi

During the Roman Empire, a lot of structures were built using the concrete of the time. Further, a lot of modern concrete structures have been constructed since the Industrial Revolution, during which time Portland cement was developed. CCC can be said to be the most suitable concrete for the new era. Our “C4S Research & Development Project” can be said to be a grand project to develop CCC in modern civilized society and save the earth.

Ippei Maruyama

If we can change construction to be green, it will be a great contribution to sustainability. All buildings and constructions can become carbon-neutral, and this will be a great success for humanity.

Where can readers find more information?

Project funding support agency: https://www.nedo.go.jp/english/news/ZZCA_100007.html

International conference where the project was presented: https://www.icef.go.jp/pdf/2021/program/NoguchiTakafumi_P.pdf

Paper on completely recyclable concrete: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/suco.201100002

Paper on carbon dioxide absorption by concrete waste: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0959652619328501?via%3Dihub

About

Takafumi Noguchi has been a Professor of the Graduate School of Engineering since 2014 and Project Manager of the “C4S Research & Development Project”. He is in charge of major positions in several national and international organizations, e.g. a chair of ISO/TC71/SC8 (Environmental management for concrete and concrete structures) since 2018, a president of the Japan Society for Finishing Technology since 2021, and a vice president of the Architectural Institute of Japan since 2021, etc. His research interests include the development of carbon-neutral concrete, sustainable recycling of concrete structures, conservation of historic concrete structures, optimum rehabilitation of concrete structures, etc.

Ippei Maruyama is a professor at the Graduate School of Engineering at the University of Tokyo (cross-appointed) and a professor at the Graduate School of Environmental Studies at the University of Nagoya, Japan. He is a materials scientist and concrete engineer whose primary research interests are in advancing the understanding of functional development.t mechanisms of building materials. He is currently principal investigator of several theoretical projects, namely, 1) Reaction process for calcium carbonate concrete, 2) Aging management of power plants, 3) Disposal of contaminated concrete from nuclear power plants of Fukushima Daiichi. He is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Advanced Concrete Technology, published by the Japan Concrete Institute.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are those of the respondent and do not necessarily represent the views of AZoM.com Limited (T / A) AZoNetwork, the owner and operator of this website. This disclaimer is part of the terms and conditions of use of this website.

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Finishing ceremony organized for the MTSU School of Concrete building | Rutherford County https://fontidipace.com/finishing-ceremony-organized-for-the-mtsu-school-of-concrete-building-rutherford-county/ Tue, 14 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://fontidipace.com/finishing-ceremony-organized-for-the-mtsu-school-of-concrete-building-rutherford-county/

MURFREESBORO, TN (WSMV) – University and construction officials on Tuesday celebrated the completion of the Middle Tennessee State University School of Concrete and Construction Management building under construction on the southwest side of the campus, according to a university press release.

The $ 40.1 million, 54,000 square foot building is expected to be completed in 15 months in time for fall 2022 classes. The facility includes classrooms, faculty and staff and a laboratory space for the management of the concrete industry, one of the country’s most exclusive programs, and construction management, both of which provide work-ready interns and graduates awaiting potentially lucrative careers .

Officials from the university and Hoar Construction held the finishing ceremony to celebrate the daily progress of construction workers by signing the final beam and watching it being lifted by a crane to the top of the structure.

“The disruptive effects of the past year and a half have not lived up to the determination of the incredible team responsible for advancing this state-of-the-art facility for one of our most sought-after and requested university programs. . University president Sidney A. McPhee told people gathered at the site, referring to the global COVID-19 pandemic.

“How it is a complicated, iconic building with four different structural systems and many different types of concrete,” Kelly Strong, principal and professor of the School of Concrete and Construction, told the audience. “The entire building was designed and constructed to serve as a learning lab for the next generation of construction professionals. Project management teams worked hard to overcome many challenges in the supply chain to stay on budget, on time, with high quality and a safe job site. We appreciate their commitment to providing a demonstration building for our faculty, staff and students. “

The university said about 200 skilled workers had worked on the project since March with “zero lost-time accidents on the job site.”

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, left, and MTSU Board of Directors JB Baker, left, Darrell Freeman, Steve Smith and Pete Delay sign t…

McPhee and Strong thanked architects Orcutt Winslow, Hoar Construction and Jamie Brewer and Bill Waits from the planning staff at the MTSU campus. The President also recognized the National Concrete Industry Management Steering Committee, ICM Patrons, generous donors, alumni and many regional employers “who have all invested in our mission to educate students in world-class academics and best practices in concrete and construction, ”he said. .

According to the university’s press release, around 30 patrons of the ICM, a grassroots local advisory group donating time, talent and money, and dozens more have funded the building.

“These organizations, individuals and many more have a clear vision of what our students and faculty need to be the best at this,” said McPhee. “As a result of this strong support, this university has a fascinating history of preparing students to meet workforce needs, as well as a great ability to project and plan for future trends.”

Chris Potter, director of the Hoar Construction project, called it “a very unique building that required a lot of coordination between us, the university’s design team and the specialist contractors.” It will be a very good learning center for this program in the future.

The new building is part of $ 1.3 billion capital construction projects at MTSU over the past 20 years.

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The world’s first carbon concrete building is under construction https://fontidipace.com/the-worlds-first-carbon-concrete-building-is-under-construction/ Thu, 12 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://fontidipace.com/the-worlds-first-carbon-concrete-building-is-under-construction/

Researchers from the Technical University of Dresden alongside experts from German architectural firm Henn are developing the world’s first carbon concrete building, a report by Dezeen Explain.

The team behind the project will use a new method to reinforce the building’s concrete with carbon fibers rather than steel rods, as part of a Funding from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research research project aimed at developing construction innovations called “C³ – Carbon Concrete Composite”.

Reduction of CO2 emissions from construction by up to 50%

The building, dubbed The Cube, is currently under construction on the campus of TU Dresden. Henn says its carbon concrete material is four times stronger than traditional concrete while being four times lighter, due to reduced need for additional structural sections.

Newly developed carbon concrete allows for the same structural strength while using much less concrete. “With this new construction material, the lightweight yet strong carbon fibers allow flexible and resource efficient construction. Conversion to this innovative material can reduce CO2 emissions from construction by up to 50%, ”Henn explains on his website. Likewise, the developers of the UK’s second high-speed rail line recently announced that they will use a 3D printing construction method in which concrete is reinforced with graphene instead of steel rods, also reducing construction carbon emissions up to 50%.

A “radically rethink” of architecture

Specifically, the concrete used for The Cube will be reinforced with carbon fiber yarn, obtained by extracting almost pure carbon crystals through a thermal decomposition process known as pyrolysis. The wire is then woven into a mesh onto which concrete is poured before setting. Since carbon fiber does not rust, carbon concrete is also more durable over a longer period of time than concrete reinforced with steel rods. As the structures can be much thinner due to the lack of steel rods – which often require more thickness to prevent water ingress – Henn says this will help “future architecture where environmentally conscious design is combined with formal freedom and a radical overhaul of the most fundamental architectural elements. “

As such, The Cube will feature a roof that folds to become a wall as well, allowing the wall and roof to “functionally merge into each other as an organic continuum,” Henn explains. Such projects not only open up a new form of architectural design, but also a method of construction that causes much less damage to the environment. Take a look at a video describing the Cube building process below.

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The world’s first carbon concrete building marks a milestone in materials engineering! https://fontidipace.com/the-worlds-first-carbon-concrete-building-marks-a-milestone-in-materials-engineering/ Tue, 10 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://fontidipace.com/the-worlds-first-carbon-concrete-building-marks-a-milestone-in-materials-engineering/

Formed from the dense carbon mesh and poured concrete, the Cube will consist of two main components.

Henn, an architectural firm based in Germany, recently unveiled the concept for the world’s first carbon-reinforced concrete building in close collaboration with researchers at the Technical University of Dresden (TUD). The so-called Cube will function primarily as an exhibition space and research center for university students, and will also house a classroom and a small kitchen. Formed from a dense carbon mesh and poured concrete, the Cube will consist of two main components, a prefabricated box that will be the floor and walls, and a double-curved roof, twisted from the foldable concrete reinforced with carbon.

The Cube will function as a hub for university students where they can come together for research and learning. TUD researchers have been studying the functionality of carbon-reinforced concrete since 1998. Now, together with Henn Architekten, the new concrete building material can be put to the test. Carbon reinforced concrete essentially replaces steel rebar with carbon fibers to maintain the industrial strength of concrete while reducing the amount of concrete used for construction.

Henn describes: “Carbon concrete could contribute to more flexible and resource efficient construction processes, and the switch to carbon concrete could reduce CO2 emissions from construction by up to 50%. Carbon concrete composite is developed through a thermal decomposition process called pyrolysis which binds carbon fibers together to produce a carbon fiber yarn, which creates a dense mesh that unites and strengthens the concrete. The elimination of steel rebar makes carbon reinforced concrete four times lighter than traditional concrete building material. Carbon reinforced concrete also lasts longer because carbon mesh is rustproof and its technical composition inherently avoids the threat of oxidation. Inside, the Cube houses a single classroom, research facilities, an exhibition space, and a small kitchen.

The unique unit of carbon concrete proves the versatility and malleability of the building material during the stages of building development. “The advantage is that you can make concrete much thinner while still being able to withstand heavy loads, which allows you to design completely different shapes. There are a few examples of finding ultra-thin concrete building elements, benches, or bracing. The goal is to move away from the huge amounts of concrete that are used today.

The Cube’s final shape merges its ceilings and walls into a single unit, as Henn explains: “The design reinterprets the textile nature of carbon fibers through the fluid fusion of the ceiling and walls into a single shape, suggesting a future architecture where environmentally friendly design is combined with formal freedom and a radical overhaul of the most fundamental architectural elements. The wall and the ceiling are no longer separate elements but functionally merge into each other as an organic continuum. Moving away from the stiffness of steel rebar for more versatile building materials like carbon reinforced concrete allows architects to design structures in new forms and with fewer structural parameters. Additionally, the lightweight nature of carbon reinforced concrete means less building materials used and less CO2 emissions during construction.

Designer: Henn Architekten and the Technical University of Dresden

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Gallery: Laaneots House wins the 2020 Concrete Building of the Year award | News https://fontidipace.com/gallery-laaneots-house-wins-the-2020-concrete-building-of-the-year-award-news/ Fri, 02 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://fontidipace.com/gallery-laaneots-house-wins-the-2020-concrete-building-of-the-year-award-news/

According to the jury, the Laaneots house is a building where the concrete has been treated with delicacy and professionalism.

“The building blends into the landscape, creating a complete living environment. The exterior surfaces have a black wood plank and white concrete in a playful dialogue. Both materials have a similar surface profile. Concrete is in the foreground. from the inside. Due to its color neutrality and rough nature, concrete beautifully showcases other materials, ”said the jury.

The special study and accommodation building of the Narva Study Center of the Academy of Internal Affairs and Narva College of the University of Tartu, the Toom-Kuninga 15 apartment building in Tallinn, and the reconstruction of the convent building of Narva Castle also received special awards.

The special prize of the magazine “Ehitaja” was received by the government of the city of Sillamäe for the promenade of the beach of Sillamäe. The special prize of the Estonian Association of Civil Engineers was received by the designer of the building Tower Pikoprojekt OÜ.

The jury for the Concrete Construction of the Year 2020 competition included representatives of Estonian construction associations: Maarja Kask from the Estonian Association of Architects, Johannes Pello from the Estonian Concrete Association, Indrek Peterson from the Estonian Association of construction, Heiki Meos from the Estonian Construction Association, Johann-Aksel Tarbe from the Estonian Construction Consulting Association.

The jury also included Aadu Kana, as well as representatives of construction journalists Eva Kiisler (editor-in-chief of Ehitaja magazine), Liivi Tamm (editor-in-chief of EhitusEST magazine) and Finnish architect Maritta Koivisto (editor-in-chief of the magazine EhitusEST) chief of Betoni magazine).

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