Bartlett students invent skeleton-inspired structural material for lightweight construction

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Bartlett students invent skeleton-inspired structural material for lightweight construction

A team of graduates from the Bartlett School of Architecture at University College London have developed a new hybrid building material designed for use in particularly harsh building environments. “Augmented Skin” combines a regimented structural core with a flexible opaque skin, which is coated with PVA to act as a casting form for the concrete. Inspired by biological skeletal frames, the material can be assembled quickly at minimal cost with maximum flexibility. The project was designed by graduate architecture students Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo and Theodora Maria Moudatsou, and was exhibited at The Bartlett’s 2014 graduation exhibition. B-Pro.

Learn more about Augmented Skin flexibility after the break

Courtesy of Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo and Theodora Maria MoudatsouCourtesy of Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo and Theodora Maria MoudatsouCourtesy of Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo and Theodora Maria Moudatsou+ 12

Encouraged by their tutors to explore the intersection between “traditional, low-tech manufacturing processes with advanced technological approaches”, the team designed a random framework of structural elements paired with a flexible skin designed to create a new element from which to launch their design. to treat. The team rendered an array of ethereal shapes alongside a series of site-specific structures using the single module.

Courtesy of Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo and Theodora Maria Moudatsou
Courtesy of Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo and Theodora Maria Moudatsou

The project team applied the use of accessible and widely available materials to create a simple frame with multiple uses. The beauty of Augmented skin lies in its simplicity: ordinary sticks wrapped in an elastic skin and cast in concrete can be assembled to form lightweight, interlocking structural modules. The modules can be assembled to form “strands” similar to steel I-beams but with greater malleability, similar to the composition of the human spine.

Courtesy of Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo and Theodora Maria Moudatsou
Courtesy of Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo and Theodora Maria Moudatsou
Courtesy of Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo and Theodora Maria Moudatsou
Courtesy of Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo and Theodora Maria Moudatsou

Various incarnations of Augmented skin include an armchair, structural beams and a bridge between the protruding rocks of the canyon. The applications for the design are endless and continue to be studied by the team exploring its further use.

Courtesy of Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo and Theodora Maria Moudatsou
Courtesy of Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo and Theodora Maria Moudatsou

Members of the team: Kazushi Miyamoto, Youngseok Doo, Theodora Maria Moudatsou, MArch Graduate Architectural Design, Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL 2013-2014
Tutors: Daniel Widrig, Stefan Bassing, Soomeen Hahm

Learn about the many uses of Augmented skin, here.

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